Thanks for not taking me out of class…

The chatter of flipped classrooms continues to infiltrate blogs, twitter feeds and mainstream media. Thought leaders continue to weigh in on the pros and cons of a model that was already in play when I was working on a business minor at Indiana University.  I skipped attending the lectures, which I could catch on a university television station, and instead spent time attending small discussion groups to work through case studies and make sense of the concepts delivered in 45 minute lectures. It really didn’t feel so revolutionary at the time.

I’ve been tracking a few Graded teachers as they explore this same possibility with their students this year. I applaud teachers’ efforts to examine how they can move from the front of the room and instead use class time to engage students in making meaning together.  Thoughtful work is happening.

In an effort to support teachers in working through this model — as well as alleviating some of the tensions of leaving class to be of service to Graded’s organizational learning – I “flipped” our last PLAC (Professional Learning Advisory Council) meeting to get a deeper sense of the nuances of the learning environment that results from flipping the classroom.

I spent a lot of time thinking through how to best instruct colleagues in engaging in the independent task before we would meet. This was not just a video to watch, but an examination of a professional learning plan that will define our work in 2012-2013. I provided both written steps and a screencast that walked them through the steps, as well as a screencast that presented the plan, much like I would have done if we were together.

Colleagues had a week to do the work,  tracking their thinking and questions as part of the google site that held the plan for linking our learning.  I would jump in to comment on their ideas and answer questions that may hold up their progress, fostering a bit more dialogue than just a simple check in. Before our meeting, I had evidence that every member of the team had read and reflected on the presentation.

When we met face to face, I provided time to anchor in the presentation, taking time to read comments and questions that emerged before our meeting… then we jumped in to the work. And admittedly, I was dazzled by the level of critique in such a short time. Using wallwisher to capture their comments, so they could see each other’s thinking and skip repeating ideas and I could organize trends of comments to respond to as part of my reflection, I was armed with critical feedback to inform revising in less than an hour of meeting time.  

The debrief with colleagues highlights why this is a model to continue to explore:

  • It was a positive experience; we had the chance to learn at our pace at home
  • Appreciated the comments that were there as models – I knew what it should look like to participate
  • If you are confused, what do you do?
  • What is the trade-off to investing time in advance? Loved that our face to face meeting was shorter as a result
  • We didn’t just read and watch the presentation, we started the process in advance – we didn’t need to repeat the comments; moved on to deeper thinker
  • I was committed to the group – the comments drove that commitment
  • I think the quieter members found it powerful to take the time in preparing; different mode of communication with writing first
  • Having the time to process was important – there was a lot here that I just needed time to think about
  • Valuable to have both — wouldn’t want to have just this model
  • We knew the protocol; we were part of a community already and felt linked because of the thinking we have done together this year
  • This format should have a distinct purpose – it’s not for everything and I wouldn’t want to do it all the time
  • Thanks for not taking me out of class…

My goal remains to model learning that can link directly back to the classroom. There are many things I would refine when using this model again, and recognize that it was the strength of the culture of this learning community that led to this round’s success. Some good questions continue to percolate as part of reversed instruction – especially in terms of when does it best meet the needs of learners.

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About Colleen

Senior Fellow at The Donnell-Kay Foundation Chief Learning Designer, ReSchool Colorado

Posted on May 1, 2012, in Instruction, Learning Envrionment, Professional Learning, Technology. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. From what I have seen in classes I see that it changes the nature of homework in a positive way. It seems to me that the teachers have to really think through where they want the students to be when they get to class. When it works the students get right to work in class while the teacher guides them in their progress. It’s been refreshing for me to see the difference.

  2. I agree Blair that there have been some good things that result. It seems the models I see working best at Graded are those where kids show some processing of the work online (formative assessment) so the teacher know how to cultivate meaning making in the classroom.

  3. I think what I dig the most Colleen is that someone in your faculty picked up on the fact that your flipped meeting gave quieter members of your faculty a chance to get a word in edgewise too.

    All too often, full staff meetings — like whole class conversations — become a forum for assertive members of a faculty to express their thinking around key ideas while quieter members of a staff just sit and listen.

    By creating an alternative forum for expressing ideas, you are ensuring that everyone can be heard regardless of their personality.

    Very cool indeed…
    Bill

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