How do we share the learning?

There are always a few articles that remain as anchors for my thinking. These are places I go back to in an effort to recalibrate the work. Often they are instructional, curricular or assessment based. My friend Steven’s article, The Power of Audience resonated deeply with me as I observed learning across Graded’s campus last week. There are learning experiences that naturally lend themselves to an audience – and in fact, fall flat without one. The perfect example is music. Tuesday night, as I listened to Robbie conduct the semester culmination of band classes, Steven’s comment, “the most effective way to engage  students in learning is to create an authentic audience, giving them a sense that someone else (besides teachers and parents) cares about their work. They need to have a vision of a product that matters. They need to learn content and develop skills to complete the product,” rang true.  And I began to reflect on where do students have a vision of a product that matters? A product that results in more than a grade in a grade book?

Clearly, the yearbook itself is much like music – audience is essential. But the stages along the way matter as well. Forward to Karin and yearbook and a panel of 10 teachers and administrators evaluating four different designs for the 2011-2012 yearbook.  It would have been easy to isolate this experience within a class, with classmates voting on the strength of proposals of their friends. Instead, as we probed the thinking that served to inform their designs, I was reminded of  the work of Graded’s Project-based PLC Group and the audiences that exist to serve student learning on a daily basis. (If you scroll to attachments, there is an article that serves to highlight different examples of audience, called “A Hierarchy of Audience”).

Finally, the 4th grade team also provided another example of the powerful role of audience in their “math games for parents” event. As I wandered through the classrooms, I was struck by students’ ability to teach their parents some rules and mathematical concepts that had a few mom’s and dad’s scratching their heads, including a certain superintendent that we all know.

I’d like to challenge Steven’s conclusion, “When student work culminates in a genuine product for an authentic audience, it makes a world of difference.” I propose that we don’t wait for a culmination, but take advantage of serving students’ learning along the way.

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About Colleen

Senior Fellow at The Donnell-Kay Foundation Chief Learning Designer, ReSchool Colorado

Posted on November 27, 2011, in Instruction, Professional Learning, Student work. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Colleen… I would love to see us incorporate authentic audiences into our practice more regularly in the Middle School… A STEM Day for the elementary school? The capstone project that we mentioned a couple of weeks ago? Thanks for the post.

  2. I agree! Authentic audience is so important. Purpose + audience gives a meaningful context and a proper purpose. I love the idea of incorporating audience along the way, and a hierarchy of audience. That has give me something to think about!

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